Nathaniel Brooks

Architecture in Motion

In Judson University - Traditional Architecture & Urbanism, Uncategorized on October 7, 2010 at 2:30 pm

Architecture is typically considered to be among the most static of the arts. Buildings are experienced as we move around, past, over, and through them. In contrast, contemporary society is often described as fluid and highly mobile. The third-year Traditional Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio began with a short, 1 week project challenging these norms to create architecture in motion.

The Republic of India is the second-most populous country in the world with a estimated population of 1,700,000,000. Half of children in India are underweight, and only one in three Indians has access to improved sanitation facilities such as toilets. Despite having a number of excellent medical facilities, India’s health infrastructure has not kept pace with a growing population and increased development.

In response to an urgent need for care within and between India’s megacities, the studio proposed a modular mobile clinic for malnourished children for use on the nation’s railways. The clinic needs to contain a waiting area, at least one small private examination room, a pharmacy, a lab, and possibly a simple surgery (a clean, well lit area with a comfortable operating table).

In addition to creatively solving the programmatic challenges of a mobile clinic fitting within a standard Indian railcar, the most successful designs utilize classical design principles, tuned regionally, to create a beautiful architectural device worthy of its mission.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: